Sunday, 12 September 2021

Face Masks - mere superstition?


We know that facemasks have no use at all outside, and virtually none when used indoors.  It is an easy subject to research if you doubt that assertion.

Until a couple of days ago,  (regional NSW, Australia)  there was the irrational requirement to wear a face-mask even when outside, even when no-one was close.  Penalty - $500.  And since the police are engaging in 'high-visibility policing,'  ie deliberate intimidation of the populace, it is quite likely the maskless individual will be seen and fined.

But that requirement has been dropped, and masks are only required when indoors. 

And yet, when I went into town today, nearly every person was wearing a mask. I drove past a high school and even there, at least half of the kids (who were outside)  were also wearing masks. 

Why?   Do people believe it offers some protection against Covid even when outside in the sun and the wind?  Even when no other person is near?  

Or are they thinking it is a sign to other people that they are good little boys and girls who do what they are required to do, and then a bit more?  


I think that the wearing of face-masks has gone from being a perceived aid to the prevention of the spread of Covid 19 to mere superstition. It is surely not a conscious belief, but somewhere in their minds, many people think that if they wear the face-mask, no germ (or Virus) will dare to come close. 


During the days of the Black Death, people used to try and avert the threat with 'a pocket full of posy,'  various herbs or flowers.  These days, the face-mask is our equivalent.   It is superstition.  What a shame that the ones who make the rules, arbitrary, ever-changing rules, appear to share that superstition!  


---------------------




-----------------

Tuesday, 7 September 2021

BOOMERS - 'We had the best of it.'



The Baby Boomer Generation - 'We had the best of it.'


It is something you commonly hear in a gathering of those of us of similar age - 'We had the best of it.'

And so we did. We grew up in a time of increasing prosperity. Few of us knew real hardship. Hardly any of us knew what it was to go hungry.




1950s

In our childhood, we knew freedom that our grandchildren never know - bonfire nights, being allowed to play near the river without adult supervision, learning independence a lot earlier than they do now. In Queensland, there's a law that children cannot walk alone to school until they are twelve. Twelve!

  



Oh yes, we were so much more free than the poor children growing up now.


In our teen years, we grew more aware of the Cold War, and the prospect of instant annihilation by nuclear bomb. I clearly remember one teacher at high school assuring us that there was a nuclear missile aimed right at us, right then. Since it was a small country town, that was quite unlikely, but all the same, just a few bombs on a few capital cities would have meant that an enemy (the Soviet Union, of course) would not need to spare a thought to possible interference from Australia.

'Mutually assured destruction,' they called the policy, aka 'MAD.' In other words, each contender would have enough destructive power to send the enemy back to the stone age, except that the 'victor' would also be sent back to the stone age.



Even now, I found six books on my shelves from that era - all about the likely course of a nuclear war, and survival strategies - if survival was possible.



 


Did we fully believe that the world as we knew it could end? Maybe, partially. I remember my father once asking me when I was around twenty, and I thought about it and finally replied that Yes, I thought there would be nuclear war one day.

We had no control over it, so most of us didn't worry too much. There was the 1962 Cuba Crisis, but we were children then and took no notice. (I suspect it was largely kept from the news, so adults would have known little more.) We must have come closer to nuclear war then than at any time since.

Most of us went on with our lives, but maybe that threat was a factor in the growth of the Hippy movement - 'Make love, not war,' and choosing to be 'flower people.'


Drugs, as well. The drugs didn't get into my local school until after I had left, but the younger baby boomers - some of those destroyed themselves with drugs, mostly Heroin at that time. (They started with Marihuana and LSD was also big in some quarters - 'Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.')



From Australian War Museum
Australians in Vietnam

The Vietnam War.

Thousands of young men were drafted into the army for two years, where they were sent to be traumatised in a war that we should never have been in. Sound familiar? We were assured that no soldier who was not a volunteer would be sent to Vietnam, but I can remember news footage of a young man being carried onto the ship kicking and screaming. He did not look much like a willing volunteer.




Opposition to our participation in the Vietnam war mounted, and when a Labor leader, Gough Whitlam, was elected, he put an abrupt end to it. I will always be grateful to him for that, as my young brother would soon have been of an age to be drafted.

So our Vietnam veterans returned, quite quietly. Sadly, some of the opposition to the war was extended to hostility toward the young men who were only doing their best to do their duty.


Vietnam now


It was not long later that America also retreated, leaving victory to the wicked communist North Vietnamese. Except that somehow, they have made a rather nice country anyway, and a favourite tourist destination.


Women's Liberation: 

Another major change was the Women's Liberation movement, helped along by the advent of the Contraceptive Pill. By the time I went to work, it was no longer accepted that women would automatically leave their jobs once married, and families became smaller. I had two children, my parents had four, my grandparents fourteen and five respectively, and that is fairly typical of the generations.


Sadly, the feminist movement has totally lost its way these days. The so-called 'leaders' seem absolutely barmy, and would rather invent offences like 'mansplaining' and 'manspreading' than dream of doing anything about our poor unfortunate sisters living under Islam.


The 'Grand Tour.'

That term is from olden times, when a young man was not considered educated until he had done some travelling. It applied only to the rich, of course.

In our day, it was not only the domain of the rich. We worked for a few years, saved our money, and off we went for a year or two of 'backpacking.' We stayed in Youth Hostels, (far more basic than they are today) and hitched rides, or travelled by bus, plane and train. We could work if we chose. As I recall, the 'Working Holiday' permit for the UK allowed us to work for 6 months of each year.

At that time, the plane fare across the world was relatively far more expensive than it became later, meaning that we stayed longer. It is only in more recent times that so many people have an annual overseas holiday. Surfer's Paradise was fashionable then, not Bali, and not places further afield.



The 1970s. 

 Parties, candles, colour. A fad for meditation and Astrology. A fun time, and the first generation where it was fine to enjoy sex before marriage since the risk of unwanted babies was slight.





Marrying, having our own families, and because we were such a large bulge in the population, things seemed to become available just around the time we needed them - everything from pantyhose in our teens (remember stockings and suspenders?) to the slow and reluctant passing of voluntary euthanasia laws right around the time we started to think about our last days of life.


Retirement.

Surely we are the first generation to have sufficient financial security that so many of us have been able to buy ourselves a caravan and become 'Grey Nomads.' Some of our parents managed it, but the Boomer generation managed it in their hundreds of thousands. In the last decade, there have been more and more of us on the roads, in all sorts of vans, from the small and second-hand to luxurious motorhomes. Nearly always friendly, snobbery a rarity. None especially rich, (the rich had overseas holidays) and none especially poor, as the lifestyle did, after all, cost something.

Entertainment around a campfire, gossiping, seeing new things. Enjoying life as much as possible before old age and poor health takes over. 'Adventure before dementia,' some would say. Or 'Every day above ground is a good one.'


Wandering, relaxing, enjoying life


But all good things come to an end.

In 2020, China exported a particularly nasty virus. But worse than that - it has managed to export its notions of how to deal with a population who might prefer to be free than to be confined. The idea of 'lockdowns' came from China, and now, in September, 2021, the idea of having a 'social credit score' and living under constant surveillance seems to have come here as well.

Australia is no longer a free country. It saddens me greatly. The excuse was a disease that kills mostly only the very old and the very sick. And yet what damage the fear of it has brought about.

There are other indications of a bleak future ahead.


  America withdrew from Afghanistan in a show of defeat so utterly incompetent that some have aired their suspicion that deliberate treachery was involved. The Taliban are now in charge there, and the women, never very free, will now be made invisible again behind their personal tents. Under Islamic Sharia Law. How very, very sad.


 

2001

The triumph of these barbarians will inspire other Jihadists. We can expect more attacks. There was already one in New Zealand (3rd September) when a man grabbed a knife in a supermarket and started attacking whoever was close. The 20th Anniversary of 9/11 is imminent. What's the betting that there will be Islamic attacks on that significant day?



And yet, the Islamists are not the threat that China is. It may be only a few years ago that Australia's leaders (very foolishly) signed a Free Trade Agreement with China, but now China is showing itself as undisguised enemy.

It has used economic coercion to try and bring other countries to heel, (and often succeeded) it has taken over the South China Sea, with a few objections, but no-one tried to stop it, it brought down the jackboots on the citizens of Hong Kong a lot sooner than they were hoping for, and worst of all, sometime probably in the next few years, it will try and take over Taiwan. With America ailing under a weak president, it is unlikely that anyone will try and stop them.


Soldiers of the Chinese Army

Once Taiwan has been digested, China is likely to turn its attention to further conquests. War with America would be a disaster.

If America under Biden prefers to act the craven incompetent, as it did as they left Afghanistan, that is also likely to end up in disaster. I don't know what will happen there, but I can see nothing good.



From a free country to what?

There is the loss of free speech, the rise in censorship, the 'Cancel Culture,' and our grandchildren being subject to lunatic ideologies in their schools, such as the ideas that males are bad, that whites are automatically oppressors, and that girls can turn into boys and vice versa.



And right now, we are losing our freedom in our own country. Signing in wherever we go, face-masks mandated whether or not they have any protective function whatsoever (they surely have none when outside alone) and the latest unconstitutional order is that proof of vaccination will be required as a condition of travel and as a condition of doing just ordinary things like having a meal at a pub, or crossing the state border - when the state borders finally open, that is.



It makes me sad and it makes me very angry. Those people who choose not to be vaccinated, (and they have a perfect right to make that choice,) will be the new under-class, along with any of us who stand on principle and refuse to use this new form of control. We have lost our privacy and we have lost our freedom




This image of a little statue which I have had since the 70s is displaying the sign which seems to alternatively mean 'Peace' or 'Victory.' Whichever, it is a sign of optimism.

I hope the reader can feel some optimism, because this lady has none left.





Yes, we had the best of it. 


 




----------------------------------------



















 

In our teen years, we grew more aware of the looming threat of the Cold War, and the prospect of instant annihilation in a nuclear war. I clearly remember one teacher at high school assuring us that there was a nuclear missile aimed right at us right then. Since it was a small country town, that was quite unlikely, but all the same, just a few bombs on a few capital cities would have meant that an enemy (the Soviet Union, of course)  would not need to spare a thought to possible interference from Australia.

'Mutually assured destruction,'  they called the policy, aka MAD. In other words, each contender would have enough destructive power to send the enemy back to the stone age, except that the 'victor'  would also be sent back to the stone age.  Even now, I found six books on my shelves from that era - all about the likely course of a nuclear war, and survival strategies - if survival was possible.

 

nuclear war.jpg

 

 

 

Did we fully believe that the world as we knew it could end?  Maybe, partially. I remember my father once asking me when I was around twenty, and I thought about it and finally replied that Yes, I thought there would be nuclear war one day. 

We had no control over it, so most of us didn't worry too much, and as we were children, knew nothing about the 1962 Cuba Crisis. (I suspect it was largely kept from the news, so adults would have known little more.)  We must have come closer to nuclear war then than at any time since. 

Most of us went on with our lives, but maybe that threat was a factor in the growth of the Hippy movement - 'Make love, not war,'  and choosing to be 'flower people.'  Drugs, as well. The drugs didn't get into my local school until after I had left, but those who were young, the younger baby boomers - some of those destroyed themselves with drugs, mostly Heroin at that time. (They started with Marihuana and LSD was also big in some quarters - 'Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds.')

What other big things did we go through?  Thousands of young men were drafted into the army for two years, where they were sent to be traumatised in a war that we should never have been in. Sound familiar?  We were assured that no soldier who was not a volunteer would be sent to Vietnam, but I can remember news footage of a young man being carried onto the ship kicking and screaming.   He did not look much like a willing volunteer.

Opposition to our participation in the Vietnam war mounted, and when a Labor leader, Gough Whitlam, was elected, he put an abrupt end to it. I will always be grateful for him for that, as my young brother would soon have been of an age to be drafted. 

So our Vietnam veterans returned, quite quietly. Sadly, some of the opposition to the war was extended to hostility toward the young men who were only doing their best to do their duty.  It was not long later that America also retreated, leaving victory to the wicked communist North Vietnamese. Except that somehow, they have made a rather nice country anyway, and a favourite tourist destination. 

Another major change was the Women's Liberation movement, helped along by the advent of the Contraceptive Pill.  By the time I went to work, it was no longer accepted that women would automatically leave their jobs once married, and families became smaller.  I had two children, my parents had four, my grandparents fourteen and five respectively, and that is fairly typical of the generations.

I think we must have been the first generation to be able to save enough to go travelling in early adulthood. While young men tended to stay in Australia and buy themselves a car, maybe think of saving a deposit for a house, young women went on working holidays in the UK, travelled through Europe as backpackers, and had an adventurous year or two before returning home.

At that time, the plane fare across the world was relatively far more expensive than it became later. It meant that we stayed longer. It is only in more recent times that so many people have an annual overseas holiday. Surfer's Paradise was fashionable then, not Bali, and not places further afield.

 

The 1970s.  Parties, candles, colour.  A fad for meditation and Astrology.   A fun time, and the first generation where it was fine to enjoy sex before marriage since the risk of unwanted babies was slight.

 

party1978.jpg

 

Marrying, having our own families, and because we were such a large bulge in the population, things seemed to become available just around the time we needed them - everything from pantyhose (remember stockings and suspenders?)  to the slow and reluctant passing of voluntary euthanasia laws.

 

Retirement. Surely we are the first generation to have the financial security for so many of us to buy ourselves a caravan and become 'Grey Nomads.'  Some of our parents managed it, but the Boomer generation managed it in their hundreds of thousands. In the last decade, there were more and more of us on the roads, in all sorts of vans, from the small and second-hand  to luxurious motorhomes. Nearly always friendly, snobbery a rarity. None especially rich, (the rich had overseas holidays) and none especially poor, as the lifestyle did, after all, cost something.

Entertainment around a campfire, gossiping, seeing new things. Travelling. Enjoying life as much as possible before old age and poor health takes over.  Or death, for that matter. Baby boomers might be the generation that has lived to be more healthy in their old age than any other generation in history, but nothing lasts forever.

 

 

nomads 10 copy.jpg

 

 

travels.jpg

 

 

 

But all good things come to an end.

In 2020, China exported a particularly nasty virus, but worse. It has managed to export its notions of how to deal with a population who might prefer to be free than to be confined. The idea of 'lockdowns' came from China, and now, in 2021, the idea of having a 'social credit score'  and living under constant surveillance seems to have come here as well.  I don't think the young ones comprehend what we have lost.  I might cry - 'NO MANDATORY VACCINATION,'  and 'NO VACCINE PASSPORTS,'  both of which things are unconstitutional, and yet our governments seem happy to do them anyway. Australia is no longer a free country. It saddens me greatly.  The excuse was a disease that kills mostly only the very old and the very sick.  And yet what damage the fear of it has brought about.

There are other indications of a bleak future ahead.

America withdrew from Afghanistan is a show of defeat so utterly incompetent that some have aired their suspicion that deliberate treachery was involved.  The Taliban are now in charge there, and the women, never very free, will now be made invisible again behind their personal tents. Under Islamic Sharia Law.  How very, very sad.

burqA.jpg

 

 

The triumph of these barbarians will inspire other Jihadists. We can expect more attacks. There was already one in New Zealand when a man grabbed a knife in a supermarket and started attacking whoever was close. 

 

Quran-and-gun.jpg

 

The 20th Anniversary of 9/11 is imminent. What's the betting that there will be Islamic attacks on that significant day?

And yet, the Islamists are not the threat that China is. It may be only a few years ago that Australia's leaders (very foolishly) signed a Free Trade Agreement with China, but now they are showing themselves as pure enemy. 

It has used economic coercion to try and bring other countries to heel, (and often succeeded)  it has taken over the South China Sea, with a few objections, but no-one tried to stop it, it brought down the jackboots onto the citizens of Hong Kong a lot sooner than they were hoping for, and worst of all, sometime probably in the next few years, it will try and take over Taiwan. With America ailing under a weak president,  it is unlikely that anyone will try and stop them.

Once Taiwan has been digested, China is likely to turn its attention to further conquests. War with America would be a disaster. If America under Biden prefers to act the craven incompetent, as it did as they left Afghanistan, that is also likely to end up in disaster.  I don't know what will happen there, but I can see nothing good.

There is the loss of free speech, the rise in censorship, the 'Cancel Culture,' and our grandchildren being subject to lunatic ideologies in their schools, such as the ideas that males are bad, that whites are automatically oppressors, and that girls can turn into boys and vice versa.  Some people in powerful positions quite literally don't know whether they are Arthur or Martha! 

And right now, we are losing our freedom in our own country. Signing in wherever we go, face-masks mandated whether or not they have any protective function whatsoever (they surely have none when outside alone)  and the latest unconstitutional order is that proof of vaccination will be required as a condition of travel and as a condition of doing just ordinary things like having a meal at a pub, or crossing the state border - when the state borders finally open, that is.

It makes me sad and it makes me very angry. Thos people who choose not to be vaccinated, and they have a perfect right to make that choice, will be the new under-class, along with any of us who stand on principle and refuse to use this new form of control. We have lost our privacy and we have lost our freedom

 

hope 001.jpg

This image of a little statue which I have had since the 70s is displaying the sign which seems to alternatively mean 'Peace'  or 'Victory.'  Whichever, it is a sign of optimism. 

I hope the reader can feel some optimism, because I have none left.

 

Yes, we had the best of it.

 

blog ownership no author.jpg

 

 

 

 

t

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Wednesday, 25 August 2021

"No, thank you, I prefer to live in a free country."

 

When they first spoke of ‘incentives’ for people to be vaccinated, we assumed they would be incentives. But they are not offering incentives, they are instead threatening wicked punishment of those who, for their own reasons, either prefer not to be vaccinated or see it as no-one else’s business but their own. We are not living in a free country if we are expected to show our papers wherever we go.

I think, therefore, that there should be mass objection – whenever we are asked to show this ‘vaccine passport,’ we should decline, maybe with the words, "No, thank you, I prefer to live in a free country."


If business owners find that people are refusing to show proof of vaccination, then they will lose profits and think again about their discriminatory practices.

A small sacrifice by some (you might not get into a restaurant, for instance) can help secure freedom for us all.

We MUST NOT allow Australia to remain the police state it has become.





-------------------------------

Wednesday, 30 June 2021

Australia - Police State.

 

From 12th July, 2021,  Australians in NSW will be required to use a code on their mobile phones to check in everywhere we go!   If a person does not have a mobile phone, the retailer must provide an alternative such as a sheet of paper, or simply record name and some details.  

example - police state

Most other states of Australia have similar requirements, all enforced by wicked fines and an encouragement to citizens to inform on anyone not complying -  reminiscent of other police states such as East Germany in the post war period, Stalin's Russia and present day Communist China. 

The requirement to check in at pubs, restaurants and hairdressers - places where you spend some time - that was accepted by most of us. A nuisance, of course, and there was some non compliance, but nearly all of us went along with it.  The difference now is that we are supposed to check in at every single shop we might visit, even if it is only to pick up a newspaper.  

This is a terrible attack on our privacy and our liberty. I doubt there is a SINGLE OTHER COUNTRY in the world that has these onerous requirements.

I did not expect this to happen, simply because it is impractical, and will reduce the numbers of people shopping for pleasure - so reduced profit for retailers. and considerable damage to the economy, even more than what has already been done.   

Like most things these days, the excuse is the Coronavirus pandemic.  This disease has caused far less direct harm than it has caused indirect harm.  It came from China, probably from a laboratory that was engaged in the reckless 'gain of function'  research.  

And then we followed the example of China with the lockdowns that have caused tremendous harm, even when the same effect can be achieved with less damage. It is like nuking a house to get rid of a mouse problem. It destroys quality of life.  Restrictions on travel, both overseas and interstate, and at times, even restrictions on leaving your home.  Wearing face-masks, and while that can be of some small use in crowded areas, it also means rebreathing your own expirations, which is not good for your health. 

And cruel, cruel things, like a new mother being separated from her newborn baby. Like family being stopped from visiting sick or dying relatives.  Like old people in Nursing Homes dying of despair when family no longer visit and they do not understand why. 

 There was once a government campaign aimed at improving health - 'Life, be in it."

Now the message is 'Life, better not to bother. Stay home." 







We used to sing the National Anthem with pride. 

"Australians all let us rejoice,
For we are young and free..."

But -  we are no longer free.





--------------------------------------------







---------------------------------------------